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Saturday, 2-Aug-2008 10:13 Email | Share | | Bookmark
All About Breastpumping and Some Useful Tips

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Whether a breastfeeding mother plans to return to work or if she simply needs a break, pumping breast milk is always an option. It is an easy, efficient way to maintain milk supply when she can't be with her baby. Many moms worry about using a breast pump...From efficiency, comfort and accessibility to affordability, ease of cleaning and ease of use. However, with the right plan, pumping can be a stress-free and empowering experience. If you have any concerns about breast pump use or simply the emotional toll that expressing milk may have on you, you should speak with a professional, such as a lactation consultant[/size]

Types of Breastpumps

There are many different types of pumps on the market -- manual, single or double electric, hospital-grade -- and it is essential that you obtain the most appropriate pump for your situation. Mothers who feel they will only pump occasionally would be fine with a manual pump; those who are going back to work and need something more powerful would probably require a double electric; mothers who have premature or ill babies in the NICU, or an older baby that is hospitalized and not able to nurse, would need a hospital-grade pump to simulate feeds the baby wasn't getting and to stimulate milk production and supply.

When Do I Pump?

This really depends on the situation the mother is in at the time. If she is pumping for a single "relief bottle", where someone else will be feeding the baby at a later time, she can follow this plan: Milk supply peaks between 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. This does not mean that the mother has to wake up to pump during that time. However, the best time to pump is after the first realistic morning feed (most moms like for the sun to be up!) There is plenty of milk to pump after that feed and there will be plenty left for the next feeding. A mother can choose to double-pump if she feels that she's still very full after the baby has nursed. Otherwise, pumping the breast from which she did not feed is sufficient.
For the mother who goes back to work and wants to continue breastfeeding, the plan is different. To maintain a good milk supply, she should pump frequently--generally at the times where the baby would be feeding. In most cases, by the time the mother returns to work, her baby is on a much more predictable schedule and this is a fairly easy routine to follow. It is wise to begin building a bank of milk in the freezer about a month before returning to work. To build a bank, the mother should pump daily in the morning and put it directly into the freezer. This way, there is less stress because there's a nice stock already there and ready to go. The mother can then bring home whatever milk she's pumped during the workday and add to the bank.
There are many ways to safely bank milk such as with freezer bags or milk collection bottles. However, one of the most fantastic concepts in milk storage is the Mother's Milk Mate. It is a rack designed for the refrigerator or freezer and the first bottle in is the first out, just like a vending machine, so it eliminates a lot of guesswork as to which was the oldest or most recently stored milk. The freezer bags are handy and don't take up much room, but many women feel that they are constantly looking at the dates to figure out which bag to use and many of them inevitably end up forced to the back of the freezer when new food is bought. Too many mothers have told stories of having weaned their child and a year later found bags of milk when they were cleaning out their freezers. Breast milk has been called "liquid gold" and it's a shame when it's lost.
Whether a breastfeeding mother plans to return to work or if she simply needs a break, pumping breast milk is always an option. It is an easy, efficient way to maintain milk supply when she can't be with her baby. Many moms worry about using a breast pump...From efficiency, comfort and accessibility to affordability, ease of cleaning and ease of use. However, with the right plan, pumping can be a stress-free and empowering experience. If you have any concerns about breast pump use or simply the emotional toll that expressing milk may have on you, you should speak with a professional, such as a lactation consultant[/size]

Types of Breastpumps

There are many different types of pumps on the market -- manual, single or double electric, hospital-grade -- and it is essential that you obtain the most appropriate pump for your situation. Mothers who feel they will only pump occasionally would be fine with a manual pump; those who are going back to work and need something more powerful would probably require a double electric; mothers who have premature or ill babies in the NICU, or an older baby that is hospitalized and not able to nurse, would need a hospital-grade pump to simulate feeds the baby wasn't getting and to stimulate milk production and supply.

When Do I Pump?

This really depends on the situation the mother is in at the time. If she is pumping for a single "relief bottle", where someone else will be feeding the baby at a later time, she can follow this plan: Milk supply peaks between 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. This does not mean that the mother has to wake up to pump during that time. However, the best time to pump is after the first realistic morning feed (most moms like for the sun to be up!) There is plenty of milk to pump after that feed and there will be plenty left for the next feeding. A mother can choose to double-pump if she feels that she's still very full after the baby has nursed. Otherwise, pumping the breast from which she did not feed is sufficient.
For the mother who goes back to work and wants to continue breastfeeding, the plan is different. To maintain a good milk supply, she should pump frequently--generally at the times where the baby would be feeding. In most cases, by the time the mother returns to work, her baby is on a much more predictable schedule and this is a fairly easy routine to follow. It is wise to begin building a bank of milk in the freezer about a month before returning to work. To build a bank, the mother should pump daily in the morning and put it directly into the freezer. This way, there is less stress because there's a nice stock already there and ready to go. The mother can then bring home whatever milk she's pumped during the workday and add to the bank.
There are many ways to safely bank milk such as with freezer bags or milk collection bottles. However, one of the most fantastic concepts in milk storage is the Mother's Milk Mate. It is a rack designed for the refrigerator or freezer and the first bottle in is the first out, just like a vending machine, so it eliminates a lot of guesswork as to which was the oldest or most recently stored milk. The freezer bags are handy and don't take up much room, but many women feel that they are constantly looking at the dates to figure out which bag to use and many of them inevitably end up forced to the back of the freezer when new food is bought. Too many mothers have told stories of having weaned their child and a year later found bags of milk when they were cleaning out their freezers. Breast milk has been called "liquid gold" and it's a shame when it's lost.

How Do I Pump?

The process of pumping is very simple. If a mother is using a hand pump, it's a bit more work than using an electric pump, but the plan is still the same (although the timing varies slightly--10 to 20 minutes). It is not necessary to sit and pump until the last little drop is forced out. We need to simulate a typical feed and approximately 10 to 15 minutes (electric) should be sufficient. Here is a standard plan for double electric pumping, which is absolutely necessary to maximize levels and decrease the time spent:
•Read the instructions for using and cleaning the pump.
•Wash your hands before using the pump.
•Center the nipple in the flanges (the cone-like parts that go on the breast), lean forward slightly, and turn the pump on. Keep the pump at slow speed and low suction. Many women find this advice confusing because they assume that high speed and high suction will get the most milk out the fastest way, but this couldn't be further from the truth. The baby's suck is slow and low, not fast and high, and it is too jarring to the mother's body to pump at such an intense setting. We need to simulate what the baby does and milk supply could drop severely if we don't adhere to these "rules."
•Pump for 7 minutes. The mother may see nothing coming out at first and this is normal. About 5 minutes into the pumping, she will have a "let-down," where the milk starts to flow.
•Stop the pump for 1 minute and massage the breast, combing down from the armpit to the nipple, all around. This gives the breast a break and allows it to reset, in a sense.
•Pump for 7 more minutes.
•Store the milk.


Tips for happy breastfeeding
- Make sure you are comfortable. Whether you choose to feed lying down or sitting up make sure you are comfortable and will be able to remain comfortable if you have to stay there for an extended period of time. Some mothers choose to sit in a rocking chair or up in bed with pillows behind the back. It can also be helpful to sit with a pillow on the lap to help support the baby a little. You will find a comfortable position after a bit of experimenting. Experimentation will be especially important if you have had a caesarean or an episiotomy as you may find it harder to get comfortable. You might find it helpful to talk to a midwife for some suggestions if you are having trouble.
- Make sure you are have some breastfeeding clothes that open at the front well enough to allow you to hold your baby close to your breast. Better still, go top less while you are learning to breastfeed. This has many advantages. It provides close skin to skin contact with your baby which boosts those warm fuzzy feeling hormones which will make lots of milk. Going topless will also expose your nipples to air allowing them to remain dry, helping to avoid bacterial infections and thrush.
- Hold your baby close and remove any wraps or excess clothing.
- Make sure you baby's entire body is turned towards you so that the hips, tummy and chest are against you. Many mothers find that they get the best attachment when the baby is at the same level as the breast, with the mouth at the same level as the nipple.
- Gently touch the baby's mouth with the nipple. Your baby will open its mouth instinctively when you bring the nipple to it. This is the rooting reflex.
- Some mothers find it helpful to support the breast with the opposite hand as the baby attaches. If you do this make sure that your hand is well away from the areola so as not to get in the way of the baby's mouth.
- Encourage your baby to open the mouth nice and wide.
- As you brush your nipple against the mouth, your baby will open wide for the breast. Avoid moving the breast or chasing the open mouth. Hold the breast still and the natural rooting reflex will help your baby to find the nipple. Just wait for the open mouth and bring your baby nice and close. The tongue will come forward and you baby will latch on. Most of the time this ensures a good, natural attachment. If you have trouble or feel unsure, ask for help.
- Bring the baby to the breast rather than the breast to the baby.
- You might find it helpful to support your baby behind the shoulders as you bring it to the breast in quick, gentle motion.


[b]Establishing and maintaining milk supply when baby is not nursing

By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

It is important to express your milk to establish and maintain milk supply if your baby is not nursing at all or not nursing well. By expressing, you will also have your milk available to feed baby - every bit of moms' milk that baby gets (even the tiniest amount) is like liquid gold.
When should mom start pumping?
•If baby does not nurse immediately postpartum, mom should begin pumping within 6 hours of baby's birth -- starting early makes a difference for future milk production.
What pump is best?
•If baby is not nursing, seriously consider renting a hospital-grade pump (such as those made by Ameda or Medela) that will allow you to pump both breasts at the same time. A hospital-grade pump is the best choice for maintaining or increasing milk supply.
•If you are not able to rent a hospital-grade pump, consider buying a pump (preferably a quality double pump) and/or hand expression.
How much milk should mom be pumping if baby is not nursing?
•Aim for pumping 750-800 mL (25-27 oz) per day by 7-10 days postpartum. If you have twins or higher order multiples, aim for pumping 800-950 mL (27-32 oz) by 14 days postpartum.
•It's useful to evaluate mom's 24 hour pumping output at 10 days. If supply is borderline (350-500 ml / 11-17 oz) or low (less than 350 ml / 11 oz), then galactagogues (prescription meds or herbs to increase supply) or other interventions should be considered.
•The research tells us that milk production at 2 weeks is an indicator of breastfeeding outcome, so it is important to get a good start. Even if milk production doesn't start out well, however, don't get discouraged--many moms will see an increase (even as late as 9-15 weeks after birth) if they continue with regular pumping.

[u]How often should mom pump?

•8-10 times per day: Until supply is well established, it is important to get at least eight good nursing and/or pumping sessions per 24 hours. Ten sessions per day is better, particularly if you have twins or higher order multiples.
•These sessions don't need to be evenly spaced, but you should be nursing/pumping at least once during the night in the first few months or anytime you notice a decrease in supply. Avoid going longer than 5-6 hours without pumping during the first few months.
•When pumping during the night, milk yield tends to be better if you pump when you naturally wake (to go to the bathroom or because your breasts are uncomfortably full) than if you set an alarm to wake for pumping.
•If you are having a hard time getting in enough pumping sessions, adding even a short pumping session (increasing frequency even if milk is not removed thoroughly) is helpful.
How long should mom pump at each pumping session?
•If baby does not nurse at all:
The first few days, before mom's milk comes in, hand expression is often the most effective way to express colostrum. Double pump for 10-15 minutes per session for additional stimulation. Once mom's milk is in, pump for 30 minutes per session, or for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk.


The Importance of Breastfeeding
Immediate breastfeeding is one of the most effective interventions for newborn survival. It provides nutrients, warmth and stronger immunity for the baby. It also promotes bonding and helps a mother's uterus contract to reduce blood loss.
One of the most important services that can be provided to a mother is preparation for and support during breastfeeding. The World Health Organization recommends that newborn babies be put to the breast within one hour after birth, that they should not go without breastfeeding longer than three hours and that exclusive breastfeeding should continue for six months.
With the right intervention, breastfeeding behaviors can be changed quickly and dramatically.

Exclusively breastfeeding infants for the first six months of their lives provides all the energy and nutrients a child needs while reducing the risks of infant diarrheal and respiratory infections, according to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

The World Breastfeeding Week, during the first week of August, seeks to create an awareness of the importance of breastfeeding, a practice that has been losing ground over the last few decades for a variety of reasons.

The period between birth and two years of age is considered a "critical window of time" for the growth and full development of a child. Over a longer term, nutritional deficiencies are linked to problems and obstacles to intellectual performance, work capacity, reproductive health and the overall health of adults.

That is why feeding with breast milk during an infant's the first six months - and even during the first year - creates a solid nutritional foundation for well-being during adolescence and adulthood.

Even though breastfeeding is considered a natural practice, it is also a learned behavior. According to the PAHO report on Health in the Americas, "although most women in Latin America breastfeed and do so for a relatively long period of time, breastfeeding practices are far from optimal."

The growing number of women in the labor market, together with the lack of labor practices that guarantee maternal leaves and a limited work schedule to give mothers a chance to breastfeed, have made the strengthening of this natural practice much more difficult.

In addition, there are a number of common erroneous beliefs and myths that further negatively affect the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. They include:

-- That a woman does not have enough milk to exclusively breastfeed during the recommended first six months of an infant's life. Breast milk is produced on demand; that is, the more an infant is put to the breast to suckle, the more milk a women will produce. The production of breast milk is influenced by the stimulus from the suckling action as well as by a series of hormonal activities that take place when an infant is put to the breast.

-- That other liquids and foods need to be given in addition to breast milk. Breast milk provides all the nutritional requirements that infants aged 0 to 6 months need for proper growth.

-- That infants living in hot and humid climates need to receive water. Even in hot and humid climates, breast milk should be the only source of food and liquids for the first six months of life. This not only provides infants with the necessary liquids, even in the hottest and most humid climates, but also protects them from infectious diseases caused by contaminated water.

The report on Quantifying The Benefits of Breastfeeding: A Summary of the Evidence, Publishes, with PAHO's contribution, a list of the benefits of breastfeeding based on scientific studies. One of those publications -- based on 260 breastfeeding mothers at maternity clinics in San Pedro Sula, Honduras - made clear that those infants who received only breast milk during the first six months of their lives were able to crawl earlier and began to walk at 12 months of age. This was in contrast to those infants who only received breast milk during the first four months of their lives.

Another study done in the United States showed a reverse link between the duration of breastfeeding and the risk of overweight: The infants who were breastfed for more than seven months had a 20% lower probability of being overweight than those infants breastfed for less than three months.

According to the PAHO program IMCI - Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses - the nations of the Americas are committed to joint actions to increase the practice of breastfeeding. IMCI seeks to promote breastfeeding throughout the Western Hemisphere. Most of the nations of Latin Americas and the Caribbean are members of the Codex Alimentarius commission, which determines the labeling and content of baby foods. It also determines the appropriate age to begin feeding infants supplementary foods. In 1989, 30 countries signed the Innocenti Declaration which focuses on the need to protect, promote and support breastfeeding.

This declaration is the basis of the World Health Organization (WHO)/UNICEF Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), which was adopted in 1992. Through the "Baby Friendly" certification, the BFHI initiative has influenced the routines and norms of hospitals throughout the world. And in 2001, the WHO/UNICEF Global Strategy for Breastfeeding Babies and Small Children worked out a plan of action for the international community about the issue of breastfeeding.



[u]TRAVELLING TIPS FOR NURSING MOTHERS


I think the best part about breastfeeding is that you don’t have to worry about ensuring clean water supplies and go through the hassle of sterilising bottles! Breast milk is naturally sterile and contains immune factors, so it is the safest drink for your baby while travelling. If your baby is over six months of age and needs dietary supplements, consider using formulations that don't require mixing in water, such as vitamin drops. If you have a toddler, you may want to bring along chewable supplements. Here’s a checklist of helpful tips and suggested items to bring along for your trip:

•Do your research & planning: Ask your friends or travel agent for advice on children-friendly airlines. Some airlines are more accommodating than others. You may want to seek suggestions from your travel agent on airline travel with children
•If you are unsure of the availability of baby products at your destination, take enough supplies to last you the entire trip ie. Wet tissues, diapers, liquid cleanser for baby stuff etc. Take sachets of gastrolyte in case your baby develops diarrhoea.
•If you are travelling to a tropical country with beaches etc, take extra care to avoid insect bites. Some suggestions:
-make sure your baby’s skin is well covered with clothes
-wear insect repellent (preferably one that is safe for babies)
-use insect sprays or bring along an electric mosquito repellent to use in your hotel room
•Bring along a Digital Thermometer/Fever Scan
•Medication for baby ie. Fever Patch, Cold/Flu Syrup, Voltaren suppositories which are for rectal use only and can bring down a fever faster.
•Medication for mother ie. Panadol, Flu medication, charcoal tablets and Oral Rehydration Salt(ORS) sachets to treat diarrhea, vitamin supplements
•Other medications: Both prescription and over-the-counter medications can be passed to your baby via your breast milk. Only take medications prescribed or recommended by your doctor who knows you are breastfeeding. If possible, take with you all the (safe) over-the-counter drugs you think you may need for the duration of your trip. Remember that other countries may not stock familiar brands, and what you assume to be a suitable substitute may not be a good thing to take while breastfeeding
•Baby Blanket/Sleep Sack
•If you plan to express milk, take your own equipment (such as breast pump) with you. Use disposable milk storage bags or containers. Don't forget to bring the power point adaptor if your breast pump is electric. Bring along a universal power point adaptor just in case (most hardware stores sell these) ie. Power sockets in European countries normally different
•If you are travelling alone with baby, ask the airline if it is possible to have an 'assistant' who will help you at each stop. For example, the staff member might collect your luggage for you.
•While travelling by plane, try to time your baby's feeds so they are drinking during take off and landing. This will reduce the likelihood of ear pain triggered by the changes in cabin pressure. Most airlines have a special seat belt for babies.
•Wear nursing clothes/sling/nursing cover/shawl if you wish to avoid unpleasant attention while breastfeeding in public.

•Carry your valuables on your body, such as in a belt worn next to the skin or a special travelling bag to store all your important documents, cash and valuables. Thieves tend to target women travelling with young children simply because mothers are often distracted and not able to hold onto their handbags.

You may experience a drop in milk supply
Your milk supply may decrease during your trip. This could be due to stress, jet lag, dehydration or illness (such as travellers' diarrhoea). It may help if you:
•Drink plenty of non-alcoholic fluids
•Avoid caffeinated drinks
•Don't smoke and Avoid smoky environments
•Try to get adequate rest whenever possible
•Continue to breastfeed, but increase your water intake if you get travellers' diarrhoea.
References:
•Babycenter website
•Better Health Channel website managed by the Victorian Government’s Department of Human Services, Australia[/size]


Sunday, 22-Jun-2008 02:58 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Japan Novelties

Japanese Women Origamir
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Sunday, 22-Jun-2008 02:26 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Japan Novelties

Floral Japanese sleeping gown. 100% cotton. Made in Japan(RM50
Floral Japanese sleepinggown, 100% cotton. Made in Japan. (RM50)
Assorted keychains, originally from Japan. RM40 each
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